Carol Powell 2015

Carol Powell, Head Teacher, Gorton Mount Primary

24/03/2015

Carol Powell, Montessorian of the Year 2015 and Head Teacher at  Gorton Mount Primary

Montessori St Nicholas, the leading charity for Montessori in the UK is excited to announce Montessorian of the Year 2015 Carol Powell, Head Teacher of Gorton Mount Primary Academy School.

The Montessori Schools Association presented the award to Carol Powell, Head Teacher at Gorton Mount Primary Academy School at the Annual Montessori Schools Association Conference which took place at the Institute of Education, London on Saturday 21 March.

They wanted to thank her for her continued support for Montessori education and also acknowledge the benefits Montessori has brought to children, their families and to staff at the school.

The annual foundation stage profile results bear testimony to the benefits to the children’s personal social and emotional development as well as to their mathematical achievements and creativity.

In 2005, the Montessori St Nicholas Charity was approached by Carol Powell asking for help in implementing the Montessori approach at Gorton Mount Primary School in Manchester.

It was her leadership and belief in Montessori which enabled the partnership to grow and continue to give children at the now Gorton Mount Primary Academy opportunities to develop into independent and confident learners.

Carols commitment to the approach has led to gradual and on-going training of all the early years teachers at the school and also to the training of three trainers who continue to deliver the Montessori Diploma at the school.

Two of the children who started at the school in 2005 won scholarships to Manchester Grammar, the first time in the history of the school.

A Gorton Mount Teacher says,

The idea of using the Montessori approach in our school was introduced to us as a vision, initially as a way to reduce or eliminate the gaps in skills and knowledge that were evident with older children.

“The consistency of the approach and development of self-management to encourage independent and engaged learners was something that everyone agreed could give the children their best start at school.

“It did become apparent that the method was not just to fill gaps in skills and knowledge, but could in fact meet the needs of children in a much broader way.

“Looking back, our confidence in the approach, our use of it, and crucially the outcomes for the children has energised us to become better practitioners.

“What the Montessori approach has done is to open us up to looking at children in a refreshed light, to reassess what their needs were and how we could meet them.